Search Results for: obesity

Is Sleep Deprivation a Contributor to Obesity in Children?

Dr. Jean-Philippe Chaput is the author of a review paper, “Is sleep deprivation a contributor to obesity in children?,” that was recently published in Eating and Weight Disorders. Citation details and a summary of the paper are below. Chaput JP. Is sleep deprivation a contributor to obesity in children? Eat Weight Disord. 2016 Mar;21(1):5-11. ABSTRACT: Chronic lack of sleep (called “sleep deprivation”) is common in modern societies with 24/7 availability of commodities. Accumulating evidence supports the role of reduced sleep as contributing to the current obesity epidemic in children and youth. Longitudinal studies have consistently shown that short sleep duration...

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The Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Paediatrics: A Proposed Clinical Staging System for Paediatric Obesity

Dr. Stasia Hadjiyannakis and Dr. Annick Buchholz are authors on a paper, “The Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Paediatrics: A proposed clinical staging system for paediatric obesity,” that was recently published in Paediatrics & Child Health. Citation details and a summary of the paper are below. S Hadjiyannakis, A Buchholz, J-P Chanoine, MM Jetha, L Gaboury, J Hamilton, C Birken, KM Morrison, L Legault, T Bridger, SR Cook, J Lyons, AM Sharma, GDC Ball. The Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Paediatrics: A proposed clinical staging system for paediatric obesity. Paediatr Child Health. 2016;21(1):21-26. ABSTRACT: Traditionally, clinical recommendations for assessing and managing paediatric obesity have relied on anthropometric measures, such as body mass index (BMI), BMI percentile and/or BMI z-score, to monitor health risks and determine weight management success. However, anthropometric measures do not always accurately and reliably identify children and youth with obesity-related health risks or comorbidities. The authors propose a new clinical staging system (the Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Pediatrics, EOSS-P), adapted from the adult-oriented EOSS. The EOSS-P is used to stratify patients according to severity of obesity-related comorbidities and barriers to weight management into four graded categories (0 to 3) within four main health domains: metabolic, mechanical, mental health and social milieu (the 4Ms). The EOSS-P is based on common clinical assessments that are widely available and routinely completed by clinicians, and has the potential to provide clinical...

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6th Conference on Recent Advances in the Prevention and Management of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity: Call for Abstracts and Advance Notice

Call for abstracts The 6th Conference on Recent Advances in the Prevention and Management of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity provides an excellent forum for authors to present their work in an interactive setting. We are now accepting abstract submission for posters and 15-minute oral presentations. Please submit your abstract online. The deadline for 15-minute oral presentation submissions is February 26, 2016, and the deadline for poster abstract submissions is June 10, 2016. View Advance Notice & Call for Abstracts (PDF) Posters and presentations are ideal for presenting scientifically based investigations, clinical case studies, and demonstrations of community projects. Posters and presentations are intended to provide attendees with a forum...

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Facilitators and Barriers to Noninvasive Ventilation Adherence in Youth with Nocturnal Hypoventilation Secondary to Obesity or Neuromuscular Disease

Drs. Jean-Philippe Chaput and Annick Buchholz are authors on a paper, “Facilitators and barriers to noninvasive ventilation adherence in youth with nocturnal hypoventilation secondary to obesity or neuromuscular disease,” that was recently published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. Citation details and a summary of the paper are below. Ennis J, Rohde K, Chaput JP, Buchholz A, Katz SL. Facilitators and barriers to noninvasive ventilation adherence in youth with nocturnal hypoventilation secondary to obesity or neuromuscular disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1409-1416. ABSTRACT: Objective. Many youth struggle with adherence to bilevel noninvasive ventilation (NIV), often shortly after initiation of treatment. Anecdotal evidence suggests youths with comorbid obesity struggle with adherence while youths with comorbid neuromuscular disease demonstrate better adherence rates. The objective of this study was to explore factors relating to bilevel NIV adherence, and to compare these between youths with underlying obesity or neuromuscular disease. Methods. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to examine youth and caregivers’ experiences with and perceptions of bilevel NIV. Semi-structured interviews (n = 16) of caregivers and youths were conducted. Youths 12 years and older with nocturnal hypoventilation diagnosed on polysomnography and managed with bilevel NIV, with either concurrent obesity or neuromuscular disease were included. Thematic analysis of interview data was conducted using qualitative analysis software. Results. Factors associated with positive bilevel NIV adherence included previous encouraging experiences with therapy; subjective symptom improvement; familiarity with...

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About HALO

The Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) was established in 2007 in response to the escalating obesity crisis and the increasing complexity of related co-morbidities. Today the HALO team consists of 17 staff (including 6 researchers), a childhood obesity clinical team (Centre for Healthy Active Living), 17 graduate students, and many community volunteers. Since its inception in 2007, HALO has received over $12 million in research funding; produced more than 520 peer-reviewed publications; has given more than 980 scholarly presentations locally, nationally and internationally; and secured more than 1.3 billion media impressions!

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