Search Results for: iscole

Associations Between Parental Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment and Childhood Physical Activity: Results from ISCOLE-Kenya

HALO alumnus Dr. Stella Muthuri is lead author on a paper, “Associations Between Parental Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment and Childhood Physical Activity: Results from ISCOLE-Kenya,” that was recently published in the Journal of Physical Activity & Health. Citation details and a summary of the paper are below. Muthuri SK, Wachira LJ, Onywera VO, Tremblay MS. Associations Between Parental Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment and Childhood Physical Activity: Results from ISCOLE-Kenya. J Phys Act Health. 2016 Mar;13(3):333-43. Abstract Background. A physical activity transition to declining activity levels, even among children, now poses a serious public health concern because of its contribution...

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HALO Researchers Involved in Several New Papers from ISCOLE

Scientists from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute participated in several peer-reviewed articles that were published today in the International Journal of Obesity Supplements. The series of 16 original contributions was prepared by the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) Research Group, a global collective of leading obesity research experts from 12 countries located on 5 continents. “These are the first standardized, directly measured data ever presented across countries from low- to high-income, and they bust some strongly held beliefs about key correlates of childhood obesity and healthy living behaviours,” said Dr. Mark Tremblay, Director of the Healthy Active Living and Obesity (HALO) research group at the (CHEO) and co-Principal Investigator, ISCOLE Canada. “Bottom line, contributors to childhood obesity can be quite different between countries. These novel findings suggest a “one size fits all” approach to obesity prevention is misguided and international insights may lead to innovative, out of the box solutions” Dr. Jean-Philippe Chaput, HALO scientist at the CHEO Research Institute and co-Principal Investigator of ISCOLE Canada led a first of its kind study to look at the link between sleep patterns and lifestyle behaviours in children from 12 countries in five major geographic regions of the world. The findings reveal that short sleep duration, poor sleep quality and later bedtimes are all associated with unhealthy lifestyle habits. However, the relationships...

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A Model for Presenting Accelerometer Paradata in Large Studies: ISCOLE

Dr. Mark Tremblay and Dr. Jean-Philippe Chaput are authors on a paper, “A model for presenting accelerometer paradata in large studies: ISCOLE,” that was recently published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. Citation details and a summary of the paper are below. Catrine Tudor-Locke, Emily F Mire, Kara N Dentro, Tiago V Barreira, John M Schuna, Pei Zhao, Mark S Tremblay, Martyn Standage, Olga L Sarmiento, Vincent Onywera, Tim Olds, Victor Matsudo, José Maia, Carol Maher, Estelle V Lambert, Anura Kurpad, Rebecca Kuriyan, Gang Hu, Mikael Fogelholm, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Timothy S Church, Peter T Katzmarzyk and for the ISCOLE Research Group. A model for presenting accelerometer paradata in large studies: ISCOLE. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2015, 12:52. ABSTRACT: Background. We present a model for reporting accelerometer paradata (process-related data produced from survey administration) collected in the International Study of Childhood Obesity Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE), a multi-national investigation of >7000 children (averaging 10.5 years of age) sampled from 12 different developed and developing countries and five continents. Methods. ISCOLE employed a 24-hr waist worn 7-day protocol using the ActiGraph GT3X+. Checklists, flow charts, and systematic data queries documented accelerometer paradata from enrollment to data collection and treatment. Paradata included counts of consented and eligible participants, accelerometers distributed for initial and additional monitoring (site specific decisions in the face of initial monitoring failure), inadequate data (e.g., lost/malfunction, insufficient...

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Comparative Study of Physical Activity Patterns Among School Children in Kenya and Canada: Results from the ISCOLE Project

Former HALOite Stella Muthuri along with Dr. Vincent Onywera and Dr. Mark Tremblay are co-authors on a paper, “Comparative Study of Physical Activity Patterns Among School Children in Kenya and Canada: Results from the ISCOLE Project,” that was recently published in the African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance (AJPHERD). Citation details and a summary of the paper are below. Muthuri SK, Wachira L-JM, Onywera VO, Tremblay MS. Comparative Study of Physical Activity Patterns Among School Children in Kenya and Canada: Results from the ISCOLE Project. African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance (AJPHERD) Volume 20(2:2), June 2014, pp. 765-779. ABSTRACT: Examination of the timing and patterns of daily activity are crucial in understanding when children accumulate the highest levels of physical activity. The objectives of this study were to examine moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) patterns accrued by time of day among Kenyan children, and compare activity patterns in Kenya to those of Canadian children. Physical activity and body weights of participating children were measured by accelerometry and anthropometry, while supplementary self-report data were captured by questionnaires. Data were collected as part of a larger International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and Environment (ISCOLE) in Nairobi for ISCOLE-Kenya and in the Ottawa Region for ISCOLE-Canada. A total of 555 Kenyan and 541 Canadian children 9 to 11 years were included in the analyses. In Kenya, boys, under/healthy weight, and children attending public...

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Correlates of Objectively Measured Overweight/Obesity and Physical Activity in Kenyan School Children: Results from ISCOLE-Kenya

KIDS-CAN and HALO researchers Dr. Stella Muthuri, Dr. Joy Wachira, Dr. Vincent Onywera and Dr. Mark Tremblay are authors on a paper, “Correlates of objectively measured overweight/obesity and physical activity in Kenyan school children: results from ISCOLE-Kenya,” that was recently published in BMC Public Health. Citation details and a summary of the paper are below. Muthuri SK, Wachira LJ, Onywera VO, Tremblay MS. Correlates of objectively measured overweight/obesity and physical activity in Kenyan school children: results from ISCOLE-Kenya. BMC Public Health. 2014 May 9;14(1):436. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-436. ABSTRACT: Background. Childhood overweight/obesity and inadequate physical activity burden Western countries, and now, pose a growing threat to the health of children in low and middle income countries. Behavioural transitions toward more sedentary lifestyles coupled with increased consumption of high calorie foods has resulted in rising proportions of overweight/obesity and decreasing levels of physical activity in school-aged children. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and to investigate factors associated with overweight/obesity and physical activity in Kenyan children aged 9 to 11 years. Methods. Body composition and physical activity measures of participating children were accomplished by anthropometric assessment, accelerometry, and administration of questionnaires related to diet and lifestyle, and the school and neighbourhood environments. Data collection was conducted in the city of Nairobi as part of a larger International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and Environment. Results. A total of 563 participants (46.5% boys, 53.5%...

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About HALO

The Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) was established in 2007 in response to the escalating obesity crisis and the increasing complexity of related co-morbidities. Today the HALO team consists of 17 staff (including 6 researchers), a childhood obesity clinical team (Centre for Healthy Active Living), 17 graduate students, and many community volunteers. Since its inception in 2007, HALO has received over $12 million in research funding; produced more than 520 peer-reviewed publications; has given more than 980 scholarly presentations locally, nationally and internationally; and secured more than 1.3 billion media impressions!

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